DIY Laundry Detergent

So, just for fun, I decided to look up the ingredients of Tide. One of Proctor & Gamble’s leading hundreds of toxic chemical companies that people use in their homes every day in an effort to be “clean” and “sanitary” whilst unknowingly poisoning themselves and their families..

Obviously, if you’re still buying this brand, you probably aren’t aware of how toxic it is. And maybe it doesn’t affect you severely, or maybe you didn’t know it was affecting you or maybe you have never even thought about it before.

Either way, you should be aware that these are the ingredients listed (not on the bottle, but on their website- reference below):

Disodium Diaminostilbene Disulfonate, Diethylenetriamine Pentaacetate, Liquitint Blue, Enzymes, fragrance, Sodium Hydroxide, Diquaternium Ethoxy Sulfate, Polyethyleneimine Ethoxylate, Calcium Formate, Diethylene Glycol, Dimethicone, Ethanol, Ethanolamine, Propylene Glycol, Sodium Cumene Sulfonate, Sodium Formate, water, Alcohol Ethoxylate, Alcoholethoxy Sulfate, Laureth-9, Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate, Sodium Fatty Acids

Let’s just take a look at a couple of these ingredients (we don’t have time today for ALL of that!), and let’s just think about whether or not it would be a good idea to wash our clothes in these chemicals and then wear them all day long while they absorb into our skin! Especially when we can use natural soaps instead! 😉

Okay, so the first one, Disodium Diaminostilbene Disulfonate.. When I search that term and the words ‘study’ and ‘gov’ up comes a study (link below) where these are the results from administering tiny amounts of it in the feed of mice and rats, (spoiler: they experienced death, diarrhea, and anal inflammation to name a few).

“Groups of 10 rats and 10 mice of each sex were given 0, 6,250, 12,500, 25,000, 50,000, or 100,000 ppm 4,4′-diamino-2,2′-stilbenedisulfonic acid, disodium salt, in feed for 13 weeks. One female rat, six male mice, and one female mouse in the 100,000 ppm dose groups died during the studies. Mean body weight gain was significantly decreased in male rats and female mice receiving 50,000 or 100,000 ppm, in male mice receiving 25,000, 50,000, or 100,000 ppm, and in female rats receiving 100,000 ppm. Clinical findings in rats that received 50,000 or 100,000 ppm and in mice that received 100,000 ppm included diarrhea, emaciation, and hyperemia of the perineum. There were no biologically significant changes in absolute or relative organ weights or clinical pathology results in rats or mice. Histopathologic lesions present in rats receiving 100,000 ppm were bone marrow hypercellularity and chronic inflammation of the anus and rectum. Ulcerative inflammation of the anus and rectum was observed in mice receiving 25,000 ppm and above. Female mice in the 6,250, 12,500, 25,000, and 50,000 ppm dose groups had increased incidences of cystic endometrial hyperplasia.”

Ppm means parts-per-million and 1 ppm would be equal to 1/1,000,000, so a very teeny tiny amount.

I know I’m not a rocket scientist or anything, but I’m pretty sure if it does that to rats, it’s not good enough for my baby’s clothes to be washed in either. I don’t know about you and your standards though. But hey, I’m not her to judge– I’m here to increase awareness.

The next one, Diethylenetriamine Pentaacetate, is also known as trisodium calcium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate and is commonly referred to as Ca-DTPA. It has a molecular formula of Na3CaC14H18N3O10 and a molecular weight of 497.4 Daltons. But what’s really important is the results from studying its exposure. Studies in animals and humans showed that Diethylenetriamine Pentaacetate binds to endogenous metals of the body (i.e., zinc, magnesium, and manganese) and excretes them. In an animal study, high doses of Diethylenetriamine Pentaacetate led to the loss of zinc and manganese mainly from the small intestine, skeleton, pancreas, and testes. Dosing over several days resulted in mobilization or binding of endogenous metals in exchange for calcium and a consequent impairment of metal- controlled or activated systems. The rate and amount of endogenous metal depletion increased with split daily dosing and with the length of treatment. Depletion of these endogenous metals can interfere with necessary mitotic cellular processes.

Liquitint Blue is a fancy term for another bunch of toxic ingredients including formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde, and a ton more I don’t even want to get into. The point is it keeps going and going and going, and it’s near impossible to even find ONE ingredient that is safe. Or one ingredient you would want to wash yours and your families clothes in.

I’m also not surprised if you’re not aware that these things are toxic. If you shop at places like Target, Costco or Wal-mart for laundry detergent you won’t even see “hypo-allergenic” or “non-toxic” laundry detergents available. You will see labels like “environmentally-friendly” and “natural” though which don’t hold any substantial value, and are blatant lies to your face, but I haven’t found any good stuff at those stores before anyways. Maybe that will change soon? One could only hope.

But there are non-toxic, hypo-allergenic brands at most health food stores, like Whole Foods. And you can also order them online. Even those ones aren’t perfect though, but they’re better than the alternative.

Making your own is the best. Here I provide a simple, easy and effective laundry detergent you can make yourself without expending too much time or energy. In fact, you probably have the ingredients to make it in your pantry right now.
The choice is yours. But I don’t expose my family to these things anymore. There is really no good reason to. I mean, I guess if you really like the way it smells so much that you would expose your family and the environment these horrible chemicals and keep putting money in the pockets of the wrong people and companies. But definitely, the choice is yours.

 

References:

http://www.tide.com/media/pdf/products/ingredients/en-CA/tide-he.pdf

https://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/EmergencyPreparedness/BioterrorismandDrugPreparedness/UCM131638.pdf

DIY Laundry Detergent
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  1. Boil 2 gallons water.
  2. In a large stainless steel pot mix 2 gallons hot water and grated bar of soap. Stir well until completely melted.
  3. Slowly add the baking soda: if you add it too fast it will overflow and spill! Patience! Stir well.
  4. Slowly add the vinegar, stir well again.
  5. Slowly add the epsom salt next.
  6. Add the essential oil of your choice and stir well again.
  7. Store in an airtight glass jar in a cool, dark place. Use 1 cup per full load.
Recipe Notes

I used the camel’s milk soap from Desert Farms ($6.99) made with raw (unpasteurized) camel milk, coconut oil, palm oil & lavender essential oil. Click here to order it, and you can use the discount code realyummyfood to get 15% off too  

It also smells really good! Enjoy

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About the Author Lyndsy Karrie

Lyndsy Karrie is the founder of REAL Yummy Food and a pioneer in the world of healing people with food. After being distressed by her son’s severe autism diagnosis she spent every waking hour researching and testing ways to help her son and family. What she found was astonishing. Now she shares her knowledge and easy-to-make, nutritious recipes while promoting clean eating in a non-toxic environment. Join her in keeping it REAL.

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